Sourdough bread - Calculations

Breaddnz image

Calculations

Lets assume the Hydration Level (HL) is 65%, the amount of sourdough is 600g per liter of mixing water and the amount of flour is 1Kg (1000g).

Quantity of Flour 1000g.
Quantity of water 65% of 1000g of flour =650g.
Quantity of Sourdough equal water (650g) multiplied by 600/1000 =390g
Quantity of Salt equal Mixing-water plus water contained in Sourdough multiplied by 28/1000 = (650g + (390g / 2)) * 28 /1000 = 23g

Total amount of dough = Water + Flour + Sourdough + Salt = 650g + 1000g + 390g + 23g = 2063g

If we only want to make 1000g of dough not 2063g we only have to multiply each ingredient weight by 1000 and divide by 2063 and the result is: Water = 315, Flour = 485, Sourdough = 189 and salt= 11.

I only understand the metric system and I find the calculations above quite simple but for those who are used to imperial and allergic to calculations all this must be a nightmare. Don’ t worry I use a calculator to work out my ingredients because I know that one day I will make a miscalculation and this would ruin my baking day.
This calculator works in weight, you have to give it your HL (Hydration level) (put 65 if you don’ t know and go +1 or -1 on the next batch until you are happy with your dough).

The Amount of leaven per litre of water is 600 gr but you can regulate your fermentation by adjusting this amount. For example on a hot summer day you can use only 400 gr of leaven.

Specify the number of breads you are going to make and give one of the following weight:
- flour per bread (not including flour used in the leaven)
- leaven per bread
- final dough per bread.

To finish on this subject you can use Pounds or Ounces if you are not familiar with grams, I have excluded cups because I use only weight (I have one of those magic digital scales) but if I find that my calculator is not helping a large number of people I will modify it accordingly, try The ingredient calculator you can also try The volumes calculator as it may help you too.


Copyright © 2005 Henri Saurat - All rights reserved